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The Redskins Have a Great Opportunity to Do the Right Thing Now – Change the Name

On race.

This only needs to be read by one soul: fellow Montgomery County resident, MCPS student (I think? Author note: do Wikipedia search on him), Jewish white male: Daniel Marc Snyder!

I just found out Dan shares the same name almost as me. So, Marc (what? Some people go by their middle name!) or, Dan, or, Dan Marc (is that French?), please take action on changing the racist name of Redskin.

Our country is hemorrhaging from 400 years of a racist system. Dan Marc, please help end this racist system getting the social platform back on racial injustice for your team!

Action is needed! Action is needed! Action is needed!

Part 1: Background (on why I am still a Redskins fan and even use the word when I root):

Even though the name is racist slang, I am a die-hard who either very strangely or very wisely have attached the name to everything awesome with our country: open spaces, the horse, the bear, the eagle, the buffalo, the buffalo hunt, the Tee Pees, freedom.

As a youngster I think I would have grown up the ultimate Cowboy fan especially growing up in our Nation’s Capital. Vaguely remembering as a 3-year-old that bicentennial summer in Washington, America was on a honeymoon of sorts.

I rooted for Cowboys when as a 4-year-old, our family went to Cowboy and Indian Land (yes, a 3rd rate theme park in Arizona that did exist in 1976). But by 1982, I had been Redskins-ized, toy tee pees, a tassel leather jacket, moccasins, “Indian in the cupboard” for this kid.

When ‘Dances With Wolves’ came to the theater I was right there with the new style Western, the new image of Native American and apply that same image to everything Redskin.

Boy, how I would have had a different perspective on America if we were nicknamed the Washington Cowboys!

About that time, Dougie had us in the lead on race. It was a happy time to be at RFK with the same group of fans: diverse, unified and in their heyday. The Redskins were leading on the field and off!

I was still unsure of the roots of the name but we were told a myth that Native Americans used berries to dye their skin and that is how the name Redskin was gotten throughout the years. Since I knew Redskins and their history long before I knew it as racist–part of me will always be a Redskins lover.

Red skin, brown skin, black skin—the helmet facial structure is our melting pot!

Part 2: From those 1st protests in Minneapolis or were the 1st protest at RFK about 1990-1992? To today, our views have evolved…

My dad and I finally believed many years ago that the name should be changed and that was years ago!

I mean, who is this tradition for? Somebody’s granddad or grandma who watched the 1st game in 1932, it is an evil tradition at that. In Judaism, bad traditions are faded out or do you still believe in exorcisms, Dan Marc? Are we going to spot Linda Blair in Dan Marc’s box?

Is a descendants of the Santa Maria? Most all Redskins players, Cowboys all illegals–I believe FedEX sits on the tribal land of the Piscataway Indians!

Part 3: A Coach I have been calling for!

Extend an interview to football coach Lance Taylor to join the organization. I know nothing about Taylor personally. Never met him.

Taylor is the only native American I can find when doing the countless searches on Native American football coaches with big time experience.

Taylor actually is at Notre Dame now but he did work under Rivera! Please call him Ron!

If Taylor did turn down the Redskins or vice versa, that would be a watershed moment for dialogue and understanding on the name.

If Taylor turned out to be QUALIFIED , Taylor could educate the whole town, organization and nation, on what this nickname stands for!

Part 4: Another solution! Do not change the team name, change the experience!

Trained as an anthropologist, there is a term called Linguistic reappropriation, reclamation or resignification..

According to Wikipedia, “reappropriation is the cultural process by which a group reclaims words or artifacts that were previously used in a way disparaging of that group. It is a specific form of a semantic change (change in a word’s meaning). Linguistic reclamation can have wider implications in the fields of discourse and has been described in terms of personal or sociopolitical empowerment.”

Now, even though this will be different and difficult because whites or Redskins fans will be using the term but hire Native Americans to change everything around the name.

Young, old, artist, historians, have them re-do everything. Remember, the Smithsonian Museum of Native American History is right down the road. (Hmmm, Dan Marc, did not check to see if this is the official name of that museum, think that will offend someone, yes!) Has Dan Marc been there and check the experience, it is great, and saddening.

But to expand on reappropriation, reclamation or resignification. (three name of the same term to choose from, Dan) I have heard from reports here and there that Native American already have done this with Redskin and other slang. This is unconfirmed but if it holds true, it becomes easy to re-brand.

So, re-market the name Redskin, Dan Marc.

Add in Native American music to the PA system—any help getting our ‘d’ off on 3rd down!

Let’s make it football. Let’s make it DC’s own. Let’s make it the Nation’s Capital! Let’s make it the tribal lands again! Let’s make it profit sharing Dan!

Part 5: What Dan Marc Snyder stands for, except overpriced tickets these days is anyone guess.

But I remember when Dan created his First Foundation (improper name) about 5 years ago, the town destroyed that organization cred so quickly. Remember it was being headed by some former G-Man, I think.

Hmmm, G-Man in the Southwest USA, sounds about as good as the CIA getting involved in Central America.

This First Foundation has been around for a few years now so maybe Snyder is more invested in this Foundation than his teams W-L record, no idea.

But now Dan Marc has a chance to prove his priorities are in the right place!

Part 6: My mom’s thought is the best!

But my mom put it best asking me: is not there a beautiful word in a Native American language that we could re-name the Redskins? For everyone’s sake already!


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2 Responses to “The Redskins Have a Great Opportunity to Do the Right Thing Now – Change the Name”

  1. Naomi Ehlers says:

    I am soon to be 65 years old. I was born in Washington DC. I am a long time Washington Redskins fan, and always will be. I see no need to change the name of this team. I have a lot of memorabilia with the Redskins logo on it. I feel that there has never been a derogatory implication of the name, and therefore, needn’t be changed.

  2. Marc lande says:

    No doubt it is racist. An article from Ian Shapira’s “A brief history of the word ‘redskin’ and how it became a source of controversy”:
    Oct. 5, 2013: President Obama weighs in, telling the Associated Press: “If I were the owner of the team and I knew that there was a name of my team — even if it had a storied history — that was offending a sizable group of people, I’d think about changing it.”

    Oct. 13, 2013: During halftime of “Sunday Night Football,” NBC sportscaster Bob Costas declares the Redskins name “an insult, a slur, no matter how benign the present-day intent.”

    June 18, 2014: The Trademark and Trial Appeal Board, in a 2-to-1 ruling, orders the cancellation of the Washington Redskins’ six federal trademark registrations, handing Blackhorse and the other activists a victory.

    I suggest you read this article. Maybe I am a Nazi because I know the term is racist yet I chose to still use it. But I believe I do not stand alone on this or blm or racial equality. I demand justice and equality on race.

    An injustices anywhere is an injustice everywhere” – MLK, Jr.

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